The “Cherokee legend of the two wolves, myth or fact? The possible damage from FB and other media sources not checking out their information or quotes…

two_wolves_saying_by_irvinggfm-d5h0563

 

The “Cherokee legend of the two wolves, myth or fact? The possible damage from FB and other media sources not checking out their information or quotes…

 

FB memes, blogs and more quotes… without researching on knowing already, being on a meme, FB or on a blog, does that make it true? Does it take away from the story ideal they are trying to share? Not really, but it depends on the meme or source and agenda. Can or do these types of Memes and constantly reinforce ignorance by passing on unsubstantiated “bits of wisdom” ( often taking it for themselves, marking it and never giving credit to the original artist even) cause any harm or damage? In some ways, yes. We look stupid every time we believe something like this. I recently saw a really funny meme on FB that used Einstein as a quote source… .the meme was funny, point made..but Einstein never said that.

 

This is a humorous but also serious blog from a Native American (labeling him and his people in this way as if they are an object to be idealized and I do think he addresses that point) http://apihtawikosisan.com/2012/02/check-the-tag-on-that-indian-story/

“Wow, I’m just shivering with all that good Indian wisdom flowing through me now.  Give me a moment.

Okay.  I’m better now.”  

..and I laughed here and at the dialogue between the two wolves he has uploaded from this blog. 

He also goes on to share this regarding all cultures being both appreciated, idealized and objectified:

“This kind of thing is harmful

These misattributed stories aren’t going to pick us up and throw us down a flight of stairs, but they do perpetuate ignorance about our cultures.  Cultures.  Plural.

Not only do they confuse non-natives about our beliefs and our actual oral traditions, they confuse some natives too.  There are many disconnected native peoples who, for a variety of reasons, have not been raised in their cultures.  It is not an easy task to reconnect, and a lot of people start by trying to find as much information as they can about the nation they come from.

It can be exciting and empowering at first to encounter a story like this, if it’s supposedly from your (generalized) nation.  But I could analyse this story all day to point out how Christian and western influences run all the way through it, and how these principles contradict and overshadow indigenous ways of knowing.  Let’s just sum it up more quickly though, and call it what it is: colonialism.

And please.  It does not matter if this sort of thing is done to or by other cultures too.  The “they did it first” argument doesn’t get my kids anywhere either.

The replacement of real indigenous stories with Christian-influenced, western moral tales is colonialism, no matter how you dress it up in feathers and moccasins.  It silences the real voices of native peoples by presenting listeners and readers with something safe and familiar.  And because of the wider access non-natives have to sources of media, these kinds of fake stories are literally drowning us out.”

 

So, all in all… Wisdom, yes… Native American? Nope…no matter what FB and other blogs says. It’s actually a Christian-style/derived parable from Minister and Evangilist Billy Graham in 1978. (info also from  http://apihtawikosisan.com/2012/02/check-the-tag-on-that-indian-story/ )

 

The various forms this story takes all over the internet from random sources that popped up during my general google search and all said it was “Cherokee proverb/wisdom/legend”:

 

Two-Wolves2 (1)

 

From: http://unbelievableyou.com/a-native-american-cherokee-story-two-wolves/

 

This one elaborates on the story even more:

(See the link at the end of this blog entry for the rest)

 

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy.”It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather: “Which wolf will win?”

You might heard the story ends like this: The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

In the Cherokee world, however, the story ends this way:

The old Cherokee simply replied, “If you feed them right, they both win.” and the story goes on:…”

http://www.awakin.org/read/view.php?tid=927

 

“One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that goes on inside people.
He said, “My son, the battle is between two wolves inside us all

“It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed“.

http://www.psychologymatters.asia/article/65/the-story-of-the-two-wolves-managing-your-thoughts-feelings-and-actions.html

 

I happen to know the artist that creates these images and she kindly lets all people have access and use to her works, which she must have done here but is originally from “Mystic Magic” on FB by Dreamweaver.

 

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http://starcovenofwiccaandwpa.blogspot.de/2013/07/have-masquerade-in-my-head.html

 

Many of us also know this one, which has been all over FB for a long time now:

 

download

 

A there is a youtube video on it even:

 

Shared by Moro

 

The opening artwork is stunning, despite it too buys into the falsehood of the source: Art title ” Two Wolves Saying’ by artist:  IrvingGFM @http://irvinggfm.deviantart.com/art/Two-Wolves-Saying-330891051

 

 

 

 

 

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“Secret Garden of the Feminine” Legend of Babylonian Tiamat and Marduk…

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“Secret Garden of the Feminine”

“Separating Spirit from Matter (Mother)”

Legend of the Babylonian Tiamat and Marduk… 

 

by Judy Tatum aka Xia  @ http://www.templeofthegoddess.org/FromTheDirector/Separating_Spirit_from_Matter_Mother.htm  (The site where I found this a year ago is completely down, thus can not reblog it. I do love this article by her and feel inspired to share it but I take no credit in writing this and it is copyrighted. I mean no disrespect but I dearly want others to have a chance to see this article and somehow be able to look up more of her works.)

“As the centuries passed, the once-supreme creative matrix lost more and more of her place in our lives. As the people who worshiped her were conquered and forced to adopt (or adapt to) the religious beliefs of their conquerors (much like the indigenous people of the Americas), the “Goddess became almost exclusively associated with ‘Nature’ as the chaotic force to be mastered, and the God took the role of conquering or ordering nature from his counterpole of ‘Spirit.'”[1]

This split in consciousness, which contains the mythological roots of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam–the three major patriarchal religions of the world today–can be traced to a popular Babylonian epic known throughout the ancient world as Enuma Elish (ca. 2000 B.C.E.). The story of Enuma Elish recounts the defeat of the original mother goddess, Tiamat, by her great-great-great-grandson, Marduk. Tiamat, the Babylonian creation goddess, was seen as the primordial ocean womb whose fertile depths birthed every living thing–including a younger generation of gods who then sought to overthrow the older generation. In this epic, Tiamat is portrayed as a great serpent or dragon (both ancient images of the feminine).

After the conquest and murder of Tiamat, the life-giving nature deity who created him, Marduk uses her body to form creation:
He split her like a shellfish into two parts:
Half of her he set up and ceiled it as sky . . .
He heaped up a mountain over Tiamat’s head,
pierced her eyes to form the sources of the Tigris and Euphrates,
and heaped similar mountains over her dugs,
which he pierced to make the rivers
from the eastern mountains that flow into the Tigris.
Her tail he bent up into the sky to make the Milky Way,
and her crotch he used to support the sky.[2]

The original myth, which portrayed the Creatrix birthing everything from herself, so that she was part of and one with all of creation, was thus transformed into a myth that suggests that “the lord” makes creation (and from her body no less). For the first time, “the god becomes the maker of heaven and earth whereas the goddess was heaven and earth. The concept of ‘making’ is radically different from ‘being,’ in the sense that what is made is not necessarily of the same substance as its maker, and may be conceived as inferior to him; while what emerges from the mother is necessarily part of her and she of it.”[3]

With the acceptance and perpetuation of the Marduk myth, a new order of creation was initiated whereby the feminine, symbolized as the Goddess, became synonymous with the realm of nature as something wild, dark, mysterious, chaotic, and dangerous. Marduk then represented the new “spiritual” order of male deities whose religious imperative was to conquer and order nature. This concept created a split that still affects society today. This creation myth, which became doctrine, is an early example of “priestly politics, whereby the mythology of an earlier age and culture is completely inverted, so that the divinities of an earlier era are named demons and the divinities of the new order are exalted to a position of supremacy.”[4]

While much of the symbology in the Judeo-Christian belief system is based on ancient, sacred Goddess mythology (including the Garden, the snake, the tree), our Western paradigm (by which I mean Judeo-Christian beliefs) is descended from this Babylonian creation myth, which places strong emphasis on the opposition between spirit and nature (implying explicitly that nature is not alive and contains no spirit). This symbology has left us a heritage of thinking in duality and oppositions. “We find this . . . in the common assumption that the spiritual and the physical worlds are different in kind, an assumption that . . . separates mind from matter, soul from body, thinking from feeling, intellect from intuition and reason from instinct . . . in addition, the `spiritual’ pole of these dualisms is valued as `higher’ than the `physical’ pole.”[5]”

[1]. Baring and Cashford, The Myth of the Goddess, p. xii.
[2]. Ibid., p. 278.
[3]. Ibid., p. 274.
[4]. Ibid., p. 280.
[5]. Ibid., p. xii.

© Copyright 1995 Judy Tatum aka Xia except where otherwise noted, again from http://www.templeofthegoddess.org/FromTheDirector/Separating_Spirit_from_Matt

 

Again, only shared by Moro. I had no part in any writing of this article. I am unable to share this by reblogging because the site is down and I found it over a year ago.

 

Art title: ‘GREED, mother of exquisite monsters…‘ by Artist:  IosifChezan @ http://iosifchezan.deviantart.com/art/GREED-mother-of-exquisite-monsters-273769165

Notes from the artist: “I had so much inner pleasure working on this theme : GREED in human conscience. I approached here a personal view regarding this “infection of the human mind”. Having its little seed deep in our ancestral instinct, GREED reached a state of art aside human intelligence.

As a twin of Egoism , GREED dooms humanity to a life FAR beyond any humanist believes, towards a world of “profit at all costs”, which is simply grotesque. The INNOCENCE of BECOMING in many potent noble souls is killed or simply transformed into mind slavery as only tiny, obedient, dispensable “tools”…

I believe that Greed alike as many other “sins” that en-shame Human Conscience will be conquered and subdued in the far future to the potent majesty of an evolving Humanity. An evolving Humanity to look upon itself as whole, unique and aware of itself Organism, choosing Compassion , Understanding and a better way of valuing each one as the main ways of evolving.

S H O R T D E S C R I P T I O N :
—————————————–
Greed is symbolized by a hand grasping the Earth and the merciless eye – symbol of mind flooded with goals of “profit at all costs”.

The Earth globe got broken in the greedy egoistically grasp and it is morphed into gold – the eternal symbol of material value.

The avatar of GREED steals every thing for him, from Earth to Sun and also the future Vitality in others to follow, leaving only painful barriers .

The innocent face is half leached of vitality (leaving behind a cold marble sculpture) by the Greedy grasp, stealing the FUTURE, the INNOCENCE of BECOMING… leaving only the ordeal of consuming life only for “hunting the living to the next day”, instead of a full beautiful potential to manifest. The feeble glowing candle symbolize the fragility in victims of GREED.”

Elves are Fairies? Wait, what?

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Elves are Fairies? Wait, what?

Dökkálfar and Ljósálfar, light and dark Elves; Seelie and Unseelie, Light and Dark Fae…

 

To begin and in general regarding Elves, this this blog has this to share with it’s readers. “The elves are luminous beings, “more beautiful than the sun,”[2]whose exalted status is demonstrated by their constantly being linked with the Aesir andVanir gods in Old Norse and Old English poetry.[3] The lines between elves and other spiritual beings such as the gods,giants, dwarves, and land spirits are blurry, and it seems unlikely that the heathen Germanic peoples themselves made any cold, systematic distinctions between these various groupings. It’s especially hard to discern the boundary that distinguishes the elves from the Vanir gods and goddesses. The Vanir god Freyr is the lord of the elves’ homeland, Alfheim,[4] and at least one Old Norse poem repeatedly uses the word “elves” to designate the Vanir.[5] Still, other sources do speak of the elves and the Vanir as being distinct categories of beings, such that a simple identification of the two would be misguided.” (1)

 

At the earliest point it seems there were generally two types of elves:

“Ljósálfar” (“Light-elves”) of Álfheim…In Norse mythology, the light elves (Old Norse: “Ljósálfar”) live in the Old Norse version of the heavens, in the place called Álfheimunderneath the place of the Gods. The idea of the light elf is one of the most ancient records of elves (Old Norse: “álfr” singular, “álfar” plural) preserved in writing, as close to the prototypical idea of the elf as we might get (Nordic mythology preserved an ancient German paganism).

According to the early Nordic source that mentions light versus dark elves, the Nordic Eddas of the 13th century, the light elves are bright and radiant. The Edda “Gylfaginning” by Snorri Sturluson, says that they are “fairer to look upon than the sun” (Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur’s translation).” (2)

 

Also in Norse mythology, Svartálfar (“Swart-elves” or “black elves”), sometimes considered synonymous with “duergar” (“dwarves”), are subterranean creatures who dwell in the world of Svartálfheim. They may be either benevolent or malevolent. The original Svartalfar worked the forges on the lowest level of the world tree. Their roles and countenance vary throughout Germanic folklore but are sometimes mentioned with Black or Dark skin as a result of working at the forge.

The Dökkálfar (“Dark-elves”) are male ancestral spirits who may protect the people, although some can be menacing, especially when one is rude to them. They are generally light-avoiding, though not necessarily subterranean. (3)

 

The lines of distinction are pretty vague now but probably was a bit more clear during this ancient time. Then the legends of the Germanic Dwarfs is intermingled with the Dark Elves. On top of that, the Greco/Roman pantheon later had some affect on how things were interpreted into more Forest like spirits for the High Elves as the Dark elves had altered with the Germanic Dwarves. Time passed. Countries and cultures changed. Legends and myths were exported and then reimported with a new interpretation and influence from that culture, then exported again! This happens a few times, including various changes from religion to religion, their appearance, stature and very nature. We have our current classifications or what we think they are now because of this, later writers and romanticism.

 

So, how does this relate to or have anything to do with Elves being Fairies?

“Fairy comes from the Old French word faerie. The word has been overused to describe a supernatural being….” (4) Early Fae had no wings and had much in common with elves, both having light and dark races. The Fae has history from France and all over Britain. In the Scottish traditions, There were two kinds of Fae, the Seelie or Beings of light and the Unseelie or dark beings. This is also true of the elves, as already mentioned.

 

In summary, we have the wonderful and rich culture of the Norse mythos to draw from giving us  the Elves, and all magical beings in their pantheon. In emphasis, I also repeat how we have seen how they altered with time, culture, religion on top of being, again, exported, altered and reimported several times too so they became all under the umbrella of the “Fairy” title. Now today, we see them as separate beings, thanks largely to, again, popular and wonderful fictional authors.

 

 

(1) http://norse-mythology.org/gods-and-creatures/elves/ (I highly recommend you visit this blog packed with Norse myths and information.)

(2)  http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/167247

(3) http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/179251 (Check out this page/link/site for more info on this, sources and info relating to Scottish Trow and Drow “Elves” !)

(4) http://www.timelessmyths.com/celtic/faeries.html (I highly recommend you visit this blog packed with fairy mythos and history, including types of fairies and from what countries and cultures!)

 

Moro

(I did not write this article in any way, other than small additions. I simply enjoy sharing pearls of wisdom and beauty from different sources into one source for many to enjoy. If inspired to from there, go to the original sources to discover more!)

Art title: ‘Differences” by artist: liiga @ http://liiga.deviantart.com/art/Differences-87959548

 

“Spiritual Warrior”

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“Spiritual Warrior”

(From Native American Prayers and Poetry)

“Life offers us the opportunity to become a Spiritual Warrior. 
A warrior is one who bravely goes into those dark areas within 
themselves to ferret out the Truth of their being. 
It takes great courage, stamina and endurance to
become a Spiritual Warrior.

The path is narrow, the terrain rough and rocky.
You will walk alone: through the dark caves,
up those steep climbs and through the dense thick forest.
You will meet your dark side. The faces of fear, deceit, and
sadness all await your arrival

No one can take this journey but you.
There comes a time, in each of our lives,
when we are given the choice to follow this path.
Should we decide to embark on this journey,
we can never turn back…. Our lives are changed forever
On this journey, there are many different places we can
choose to slip into and hide. But the path goes on.
The Spiritual Warrior stays the course, wounded at times,
exhausted and out of energy. Many times, the Warrior will
struggle back to their feet to take only a few steps before
falling again.

Rested, they forge on,
continuing the treacherous path.
The journey continues. The Spiritual Warrior
stays the course. Weakened, but never broken.
One day, the battle, loneliness and desperate fights are over.
The sun breaks through the clouds; the birds begin to sing
their sweet melodies. There is a change in the energy.
A deep change within the self.

The warrior has fought the courageous fight.
The battle of the dark night of the soul is won.
New energy now fills the Warrior.
A new path is now laid before them.
A gentler path filled with the inner-knowing
of one who has personal empowerment.

With their personal battle won, they are filled with joy.
A new awareness that they are one with the Spirit beams
as they go forth to show others the way.
They are not permitted to walk the path for others.
They can only love, guide and be a living example
of the Truth of their being.”

(Check out this source for more that inspires you in your life and personal journey)
Source:  http://www.blackhawkproductions.com/poetrynative.htm

Moro

(I did not write this article in any way. I simply enjoy sharing pearls of wisdom and beauty from different sources into one source for many to enjoy. If inspired to from there, go to the original sources to discover more!)

Art title: “Native Silhouette” by artist: Sakaib @http://www.deviantart.com/art/Native-Silhouette-140155759

ARANYANI: Indian/Hindu Goddess of the Forest…

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ARANYANI: Indian/Hindu Goddess of the Forest…

“…Forests have always been central to Indian civilization. It represented the feminine principle in prakrti. In the Hindu pantheon, forests have been worshiped as Goddess Aranyani, the Goddess of the Forests and Animals that dwell within them. Forests are the primary source of life and fertility. The forest as a community has been viewed as a model for societal and civilizational evolution.

The Indian civilization was guided by the diversity, harmony and self-sustaining nature of the forest. Aranya means forest. The Aranyakas form the third part of the Vedas. They were developed by the hermits, living in the forests. They reflect an explicit transition in the philosophy of life of man. So ‘Aranya Samskriti’ the culture of the forest was not a condition of primitiveness but one of conscious choice. Indian culture considers the forest as the highest form of cultural evolution.

As a source of life nature was venerated as sacred and human evolution was measured in terms of man’s capacity to merge with her rhythms and patterns intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. The forest thus nurtured an ecological civilization in the most fundamental sense of harmony with nature. Such knowledge that came from participation in the life of the forest was the substance not just of Aranyakas or forest texts, but also the everyday beliefs of tribal and peasant society.

The forest as the highest expression of the earth’s fertility and productivity is symbolised in yet another form as the Earth Mother, as Vana Durga or Tree Goddess. In Bengal she is associated with Avasthhaor or Banbibi, the lady of the forest. In Comilla, Bangla Desh, she is Bamani, in Assam she is Rupeswari. In folk and tribal cultures especially, trees and forests are also worshiped as Vana Devatas or forest deities. In the Southern Indian states, the concept of Vana Devatas means forest spirits.” (1)

“Aranyani has the distinction of having one of the most descriptive hymns in the Rigveda dedicated to her, in which she is described as being elusive, fond of quiet glades in the jungle, and fearless of remote places. In the hymn, the supplicant entreats her to explain how she wanders so far from the fringe of civilization without becoming afraid or lonely. She wears anklets with bells, and though seldom seen, she can be heard by the tinkling of her anklets.[1] She is also described as a dancer. Her ability to feed both man and animals though she ’tills no lands’ is what the supplicant finds most marvelous. The hymn is repeated in Taittiriya Brahmana and interpreted by the commentator of that work.[2]

Aranyani bears resemblance to later day forest deities like Bonobibi in Bengal and Vana Durga. Her worship has declined in modern day Hinduism, and it is rare to find a temple dedicated to Aranyani.” (2)

 

“The hymn of Aranyani:

Rig Veda, Book 10, Hymn 146:

HYMN CXLVI. Aranyani.

1. GODDESS of wild and forest who seemest to vanish from the sight.
How is it that thou seekest not the village? Art thou not afraid?
2 What time the grasshopper replies and swells the shrill cicala’s voice,
Seeming to sound with tinkling bells, the Lady of the Wood exults.
3 And, yonder, cattle seem to graze, what seems a dwelling-place appears:
Or else at eve the Lady of the Forest seems to free the wains.
4 Here one is calling to his cow, another there hath felled a tree:
At eve the dweller in the wood fancies that somebody hath screamed.
5 The Goddess never slays, unless some murderous enemy approach.
Man eats of savoury fruit and then takes, even as he wills, his rest.
6 Now have I praised the Forest Queen, sweet-scented, redolent of balm,
The Mother of all sylvan things, who tills not but hath stores of food.(3)

(translated in late nineteenth century by Ralph Griffiths)

 

(1) http://vedicgoddess.weebly.com/3/post/2012/09/another-great-post-by-yogi-ananda-saraswathi-devi-aranyani.html; Author: Yogi Ananda Saraswathi on 09/10/2012

(2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aranyani

(3)  http://www.allbeliefs.com/archive/index.php/t-5913.html (forum, poster: bhuvana-mohan dasa  07-29-2008, 04:18 PM)

 

Moro

(I did not write this article in any way. I simply enjoy sharing pearls of wisdom and beauty from different sources into one source for many to enjoy. If inspired to from there, go to the original sources to discover more!)

 

Art source: http://hindugodsandgoddesses.weebly.com/aranyani.html No title or artist/link is listed

 

The Irish Celtic Legend of the Fomorians? Who were they?

Lugh vs Balor2

 

The Irish Celtic Legend of the Fomorians? Who were they? 

In this, I share four different sources of information but none of them, nor in total has the truth behind the myth and legend ever been fully solved. They are more often than not now thought to be ancient settlers from the the Northern Mainland that were physically much larger in comparison to the different migration waves of the Celtic people in the years to follow. 

Source one has this to say: “Quite honestly, Griffon, nobody knows! This drawing of a Fomorian is from an old manuscript. In all of the descriptions from writings derived from the oldest of oral traditions, the Fomorians were hard-fighting giant sea monsters, each of them with a single leg, arm and eye. They made several incursions into Eire, dating all the way back to the island’s earliest history, as they were already in Ireland when Partholon came. A warfaring race, they battled with everyone they met, notably the Tuatha De Danaan with whom they also intermarried.

As to who they actually were, speculations abound. Their symbolic identity is as much debated as their geographical origins. Some sources suggest they were the gods of chaos pitted against the Tuatha De Danaan who were the gods of order. Others theorize they are symbolic of the gods of pre-Goidelic Ireland, or something like the hunter-gatherers who eventually ceded to the neolithic farmers, as they were living off whatever they could kill before Partholon and his tribe came with their plows and cattle.

In Old Irish, fo muire means “under the sea”. After the age of myth had passed, any and all sea raiders were called Fomorians, further muddying their original identity. We’ll probably never know who they really were, especially since actual material (artifacts & archaeology) evidence is almost nil.”(1)

Source two has this to share: “ Fomorians : Having now “disposed of ” the Fomorians it is a good time to review their influence on Ireland. Chronologically they do not fit easily into our picture. They appear first in the antique period of Partholon and continue to reappear until their ultimate defeat by the Tuatha de Danann. Long as their tenure was they are not represented as the “aboriginal” Irish race but as a sea-roving people who established themselves on a base in Tory Island, off the Donegal coast. Their influence seems over the years to have extended over a large part of the country. Sheep-farmers in life-style, they are given a “bad press” by their more civilized (?) rivals. Thus we hear they were associated with evil – night – death. They are described as grotesque — sometimes with one arm, one eye, one leg. Interestingly there are drawings of the” unusual” people found in the West Indies and in America after Columbus which have many points in common with the Fomorians! (Psychological reaction to the new – unfamiliar – and therefore terrifying) .They were also stated to practise child sacrifice, not unknown among many ancient peoples, and certainly attributed to the Phoenicians/Carthaginians — another seafaring race and avid colonists. The name of one of their leaders — Balor — has been suggested as being derived from the Phoenician/Carthaginian god Baal (also spelt Bealiah). As sea-rovers they are also suggested to have a Scandinavian origin. (Rock scribings in Norway indicate the use of quite large ships from the Bronze Age at least).”(2)

 

Source three offers: “In Irish mythology, the Fomoire (or Fomorians) are a semi-divine race said to have inhabited Ireland in ancient times. They may have once been believed to be the beings who preceded the gods, similar to the Greek Titans. It has been suggested that they represent the gods of chaos and wild nature, as opposed to the Tuatha Dé Danann who represent the gods of human civilization. Alternatively, they may represent the gods of a proposed pre-Goidelic population of Ireland. (3)

 

Finally, the forth largest contributor to this wonderful myth and legend shares this:

“Ireland’s Wars: The Mythic Conflicts Of The Fomorians, Tuatha De Danann And Milesians
Posted on January 3, 2012 by HandsofBlue  (For the rest of this great article and even more information, please see the original article)

“Next up were the Fomorians, who have many guises depending on who you read, variously described as God-like beings, spirits of chaos and nature, giants, more descendants of Noah, farmers, or just plain old pirates from Africa. They settled Ireland after the demise of Cessair and remained there until the arrival of even more descendants of Noah: the followers of Partholon, a man from Greece or the Middle-East depending on the sources. One wonders why he couldn’t find anywhere better to settle between here and there.

Three years after arriving in South Kerry (and after he had caused several lakes to spring up from the ground miraculously) Partholon and the Fomorians came to blows in the first recorded battle of Irish “history”.

The Fomorians in Ireland were led by a fellow named Cichol Gricenchos – the second name meaning “footless”. The Fomorians were, apparently, a simple people who lived a hunter-gatherer lifestyle, while Partholon and his crowd were farmers, that is, more advanced.

The battle between the two took place at least two millennia before the birth of Christ. Numbers are not made clear, but Partholon had less than 10’000 followers total. Cichol had 800 at the battle. He might have been outnumbered.

They fought at the Battle of Magh Ithe, a plain somewhere between Lough Swilly, Lough Foyle and the River Finn (so, Donegal or Tyrone really). Cichol and his Fomorions were defeated and wiped out to a man, but it was not the last time that race would pop up, Dalek-like, as Irish mythologies stock villain.

With the other contending occupiers gone, Partholon settled in for a more peaceful life, but did not plan for another batch of plague that wiped out him and all of his people at the same time, somewhere near Tallaght in modern day Dublin (“Tallaght” meaning “Plague burial place”).

30 years later, a relative of Partholon, Nemed, arrived in Ireland from the Caspian Sea. He wasn’t there long before more Fomorians, this time under Kings of the name of Gann and Segann began to harass and raid the island yet again, leading to Ireland’s first proper war.

Nemed was a leader of some renown and his people were fierce warriors. He defeated the Fomorians at Ros Fraechain where both of their Kings were killed, following that up with three more victories at Badbgna (somewhere in Connaught), Cnamros (somewhere in Leinster) and Dal Riada (in Ulster), going on to build the first forts. It would seem clear that the Fomorians just weren’t that great in battle, or were more used to simple raidings.

But things were soon looking up for them. The old enemy – plague – stuck the Nemedians hard nine years after their arrival, killing three thousand of them, including Nemed himself. The Fomorians had gained great leaders of their own, in the form of two brothers, Morc and Conand. They had established a mighty tower on Tory Island and from there, were able to oppress what remained of the Nemedians, extracting huge amounts of tribute in goods and slaves.

So things remained for over two centuries (people lived long lives back then) before the Nemedians, all 60’000 of them at this point, had enough and rose up in rebellion. Led by three great champions, Semul, Erglan and Fergus Red-Side, they attacked the Fomorians, reached Tory Island, and pulled down Conand’s tower, killing him and, conveniently, all his heirs too. Morc still remained, and the two sides fought a great sea battle nearby. Whatever it was, bad weather or divine intervention, the seas rose and both fleets were wrecked, only 30 or so Nemedians surviving out of both forces. Those survivors left Ireland, leaving the land desolate once again.” (4)

 

AFTER READING THIS, WHO DO YOU THINK THEY WERE? 

 

(1) http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Post/542273

 

(2) http://www.knowth.com/ireland-prehistory.htm 

(3) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fomorians 

(4) http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/01/03/irelands-wars-the-mythic-conflicts-of-the-fomorians-tuatha-de-danann-and-milesians

 

Moro

(I did not write this article in any way. I simply enjoy sharing pearls of wisdom and beauty from different sources into one source for many to enjoy. If inspired to from there, go to the original sources to discover more!)

 

Art title: ‘The Battle of Lugh and Balor” by artis source:  Ionus @ http://ionus.deviantart.com/art/The-Battle-of-Lugh-and-Balor-115297124

 

Note from Artistic source: “In this occasion, here is one of the chapters of Celtic mythology I like the most: the fight between Lugh, the celtic god of Sun, and Balor of the Fomors, his grandfather and foe. It was said that Balor was an one-eyed giant that kept his eye closed, but at the moment he opened it, he was capable of killing instantly in one look an entire army. You can imagine how it ended: Lugh won him by sticking his spear into the Fomor’s eye at the moment he was about to open it.”

“Butterfly Spirit Animal & Totem”

butterfly_by_shahar12-d47zxrn

 

The butterfly is one of the most emblematic totem animals symbolizing personal transformation. If you see the butterfly as your totem or spirit animal, pay attention to the areas in your life or personality that are in need of profound change or transformation. Perhaps, this animal totem guides you to be sensitive to your personal cycles of expansion and growth, as well as the beauty of life’s continuous unfolding. An important message carried by the spirit of the butterfly is about the ability to go through important changes with grace and lightness.

 

Butterfly Symbolism

What is the meaning of the butterfly? This animal totem is primarily associated with symbolism of change and transformation.

  • Powerful transformation, metamorphosis in your life, personality
  • Moving through different life cycles
  • Renewal, rebirth
  • Lightness of being, playfulness
  • Elevation from earthly matters, tuning into emotional or spiritual
  • The world of the soul, the psyche

A secondary meaning of the butterfly is about finding joy in life and lightness of being.

 

Butterfly totem and transformation

The butterfly is a symbol of powerful transformations. By analogy to the development of this animal, the meaning associated with the butterfly emphasizes the ability to move from one state, perspective, lifestyle to another.

When the butterfly comes into your life as spirit guide, you may be going through or expect important changes in your life. More than changes in your environment, the transformation the butterfly totem points to are more internal: They could be related to your own perspective on a subject, aspects of your personality, or personal habits. Personal transformation is emblematic of the butterfly symbolism.

Butterfly totem symbol of joy and lightness of being

When the butterfly shows up in your life as a spirit animal or totem, it might indicate the need to look at a conflicting situation with more lightness and different perspective. This totem animal is symbolic of lightness of being and elevation from the heaviness of tensions.

This power animal invites those who have a connection with it to bring joy and bliss into their lives. Butterflies often have bright colors. By extension, they are associated with aliveness and brightness. The message of this totem animal is to lighten up and add more color to your life. Perhaps it’s time to express yourself more fully and show your colorful personality.

The Butterfly and the world of the Soul

In many traditions around the world, the butterfly is a symbol of the soul or soul world. For example, in Chinese symbology, it can represent immortality. For the Japanese, a white butterfly symbolizes the soul the departed ones.

In Ancient Greece, butterflies represent the psyche or soul, and its attribute of immortality.

Calling the butterfly totem for support

The butterfly is a powerful animal to call when you need support in times of transition, whether it’s at work, in a relationship, or when you’re doing inner work. Great ally during intense periods of personal transformation, it will add ease and lightness to the process.

This power animal is a good inspiration for adding more color into your life and self-expression. Those who have the butterfly as a totem animal may be naturally inclined to express themselves openly, to reflect their colors into their environment.”

 

By Elena Harris, SpiritAnimal.com Editor

 

Look for more articles here on the same subjects. I hope to gather as many articles on various and same subjects from amazing websites and blogs as I can find in time. If there is nothing else at the moment, check back later. It just means I hadn’t gotten to it yet.  😀 

 

Check out the website where this comes from and take the quiz… find out your spirit guide. :3

Original source: http://www.spiritanimal.info/butterfly-spirit-animal/

 

Moro

 

Stock Photo title: “Butterfly‘ by artist: shahar12 @ http://shahar12.deviantart.com/art/Butterfly-255298739